February 17, 2009

The Immaculate designer prosthesis

Something that's always bothered me about traditional prostheses is the constant attempt to mimic normal human morphology. Artificial legs are supposed to look like real legs and artificial arms are supposed to look like real arms, right?

Well, that shouldn't always have to be the case. Why not think outside the box? This is an opportunity, after all, for some disabled people to express themselves and change their bodies in novel and unexpected ways.

This is exactly the perspective of Hans Alexander Huseklepp who believes that prostheses should go beyond mere functionality and become objects of fashion and identity. To this end he has designed the "Immaculate" which explores new possibilities for assistive devices.

Immaculate is a neurological prosthetic that will be connected to a user's central nervous system. The exterior of the prosthetic is textile clad in Corian plates which, in principle, will allow embedded technology to be seamlessly integrated. This material will also give the prosthetic a clear graphical identity. In addition, each joint is a globe joint, allowing a larger freedom of movement than a normal human arm.

3 comments:

robert_t said...

Elegant, striking, actually rather sexy. Nice design. Why indeed should a prosthetic look as boring and "samey" as the human limb it's replacing? This is brave and fresh.

Mac said...

Something that's always bothered me about traditional prostheses is the constant attempt to mimic normal human morphology.

Bingo. I'm reminded of that great line from the first page of "Neuromancer" about the bartender's arm encased in grubby pink rubber.

Enlightened one said...

It looks good. But hopefully It will not be needed, since we will be able to regenerate our limbs in the future.